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Governance

With a family history that has seen fortunes rise and fall on numerous occasions, Maximillian Gehrmann discusses the main reasons why intergenerational wealth is lost.

With a family history that has seen fortunes rise and fall on numerous occasions, Maximillian Gehrmann discusses the main reasons why intergenerational wealth is lost.

With a family line that dates to the year 1000, Octavian Pilati learnt from an early age the weight and importance of legacy. But when a crisis saw him taking over the family business at the age of 26 and subsequently shepherding a successful exit, he saw an opportunity to break out on his own and advise others of the pitfalls of fractured family dynamics and unclear succession planning.

With a family line that dates to the year 1000, Octavian Pilati learnt from an early age the weight and importance of legacy. But when a crisis saw him taking over the family business at the age of 26 and subsequently shepherding a successful exit, he saw an opportunity to break out on his own and advise others of the pitfalls of fractured family dynamics and unclear succession planning.

The chairman of Campden Club’s two-day event on March 30 and 31 talks to Campden FB about his main takeaways.

The chairman of Campden Club’s two-day event on March 30 and 31 talks to Campden FB about his main takeaways.

The Chinese proverb “Wealth never survives three generations” has an equivalent in many cultures and has appeared in writing over centuries. The international notion that the first generation builds wealth, the second spends and otherwise mismanages it, and the third is left with nothing, isn’t just a platitude, though says Wharton finance professor Richard Marston.

The Chinese proverb “Wealth never survives three generations” has an equivalent in many cultures and has appeared in writing over centuries. The international notion that the first generation builds wealth, the second spends and otherwise mismanages it, and the third is left with nothing, isn’t just a platitude, though says Wharton finance professor Richard Marston.

The family talent advisor, successor development coach and former head of the Musgrave family council talks to Campden FB about successful successorship, encouraging talent and the importance of being fully informed.

The family talent advisor, successor development coach and former head of the Musgrave family council talks to Campden FB about successful successorship, encouraging talent and the importance of being fully informed.

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