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July 1, 2006

Starting with virtually nothing in the 1940s, the Jacobson family built an industrial distribution empire now worth over $3 billion. Suzy Bibko discusses the challenges of the business and the creation of its family investment firms

Suzy Bibko is editor of Families in Business.

Starting with virtually nothing in the 1940s, the Jacobson family built an industrial distribution empire now worth over $3 billion. Suzy Bibko discusses the challenges of the business and the creation of its family investment firms

July 1, 2006

Going public was not an option for Bertelsmann’s Mohn family. In the nick of time the family managed to hold onto control of their media powerhouse. Melanie Stern reports on Bertelsmann’s buyback and what could have been Germany’s biggest IPO

Melanie Stern is section editor of Families in Business.

Going public was not an option for Bertelsmann's Mohn family. In the nick of time the family managed to hold onto control of their media powerhouse. Melanie Stern reports on Bertelsmann's buyback and what could have been Germany's biggest IPO

March 1, 2006

Behind the dazzling smiles of Lakshmi Mittal and his heir apparent Aditya is a grim determination to become the biggest steel producer in the world. Whether Arcelor and the French business community are to be persuaded has yet to be seen. Melanie Stern reports

Melanie Stern is section editor of Families in Business.

Behind the dazzling smiles of Lakshmi Mittal and his heir apparent Aditya is a grim determination to become the biggest steel producer in the world. Whether Arcelor and the French business community are to be persuaded has yet to be seen. Melanie Stern reports

March 1, 2006

Campden Conferences and the BDO Centre for Family Business are launching the first of a series of surveys on international family values. Peter Leach and Juliette Johnson, of BDO, explain the rationale

Peter Leach is chairman of the BDO Centre for Family Business. Juliette Johnson is senior manager of the BDO Centre for Family Business. www.bdo.co.uk/cfb

Campden Conferences and the BDO Centre for Family Business are launching the first of a series of surveys on international family values. Peter Leach and Juliette Johnson, of BDO, explain the rationale

September 1, 2005

There are several routes owners can take to sell off the family business. However, the process is not always as straight-forward as some may think.George Malim outlines the best way to please everyone and get the best price before the seller puts their feet up

George Malim is a freelance journalist. malim@blueyonder.co.uk.

There are several routes owners can take to sell off the family business. However, the process is not always as straight-forward as some may think.George Malim outlines the best way to please everyone and get the best price before the seller puts their feet up

July 1, 2005

Selling the family business need not be fraught with problems. If you hire a good outside advisor, you can protect your interests, secure a good deal and continue to manage. John Willert and Brian Silston urge you not to be taken in by misinformation and myth

John Willert is vice-president at de Visscher & Co, a financial advisory firm for family-owned companies. Brian Silston is an associate. www.devisscher.com

Selling the family business need not be fraught with problems. If you hire a good outside advisor, you can protect your interests, secure a good deal and continue to manage. John Willert and Brian Silston urge you not to be taken in by misinformation and myth

July 1, 2005

Family firms are not inherently big risk-takers. Responsibility sits heavily on a leader’s shoulders because they will not want to sacrifice generations of toil. However, caution does not mean a company cannot be successfully competitive, writes George Malim

George Malim is a freelance journalist based in London. malim@blueyonder.co.uk

Family firms are not inherently big risk-takers. Responsibility sits heavily on a leader's shoulders because they will not want to sacrifice generations of toil. However, caution does not mean a company cannot be successfully competitive, writes George Malim

July 1, 2005

Learning from and valuing the past, developing on a personal and business level and striving to embrace new concepts are all key to successful growth strategies for family firms. Joachim Schwass summarises the findings of an exhaustive and revealing study

Professor Joachim Schwass is the author of Wise Growth Strategies in Leading Family Businesses (Palgrave Macmillan 2005) and co-directs the IMD program Leading the Family Business.

Learning from and valuing the past, developing on a personal and business level and striving to embrace new concepts are all key to successful growth strategies for family firms. Joachim Schwass summarises the findings of an exhaustive and revealing study

May 1, 2005

Both sides of a three-generation manufacturing business have been to see the corporate attorney to end their business arrangement. Neither branch of the family wanted to be tied to the other any longer financially.

This case was written and co-ordinated by Richard Segal, chairman of the Family Business Council of Southeastern Michigan.

Both sides of a three-generation manufacturing business have been to see the corporate attorney to end their business arrangement. Neither branch of the family wanted to be tied to the other any longer financially. Both sides are willing to either buy or be bought, but neither has the funds to do so, and neither is willing to finance the sale on time. Trust in the family has run aground with no relief in sight.

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