Vimeo
LinkedIn
Instagram
Share |

pwc

October 25, 2012

Despite the big role family businesses play in employment generation and economic activity in countries worldwide, governments are doing little to support the sector.

Despite the big role family businesses play in employment generation and economic activity in countries worldwide, governments are doing little to support the sector.

March 1, 2006

Scott McCulloch is editor of Families in Business.

November 1, 2005

To stay ahead of the game, businesses need to recruit and retain top-quality staff at all levels – but especially at the top – so incentives and rewards are key. Melanie Stern examines the changes ahead in executive compensation for non-family CEOs

Melanie stern is section editor of Families in Business.

To stay ahead of the game, businesses need to recruit and retain top-quality staff at all levels – but especially at the top – so incentives and rewards are key. Melanie Stern examines the changes ahead in executive compensation for non-family CEOs

Much has been made of the compensation packages awarded to today's top executives, with pay packets expanding faster than the waistlines of most well-dined CEOs – all too often, while their companies underperform.

September 1, 2005

Fuelled by smart globalisation of business and investment interests, the explosion in family wealth across India and the Far East has private banks salivating and eager to set up shop in this fruitful and burgeoning new territory, finds Melanie Stern

Melanie Stern is section editor of Families in Business

Fuelled by smart globalisation of business and investment interests, the explosion in family wealth across India and the Far East has private banks salivating and eager to set up shop in this fruitful and burgeoning new territory, finds Melanie Stern

July 1, 2005

Despite the size and power of some of the larger funds, private equity providers come in all shapes and sizes and may have a variety of investment appetites. But what are the pros and cons of this route for families? Richard Willsher takes a look at the evidence

Richard Willsher is a freelance journalist specialising in finance

Despite the size and power of some of the larger funds, private equity providers come in all shapes and sizes and may have a variety of investment appetites. But what are the pros and cons of this route for families? Richard Willsher takes a look at the evidence

Do private equity investors find family businesses attractive and what are they really looking for?

January 1, 2005

Families that have invested offshore to avoid disclosing where they hold their savings must review their options now, say experts familiar with the European savings tax directive. Bob Reynolds explains

Bob Reynolds is consultant editor of Offshore Red.

Families that have invested offshore to avoid disclosing where they hold their savings must review their options now, say experts familiar with the European savings tax directive. Bob Reynolds explains

May 1, 2004

When PricewaterhouseCoopers launched its survey of Irish family businesses earlier this year it found the key threat to all family businesses was succession, and yet only 51% of Irish family bus­inesses have a formal succession plan in place. PwC’s Paul Hennessy and Dermot Reilly explain why

Paul Hennessy  is lead partner for Family Business Services at PricewaterhouseCoopers.
Dermot Reilly  is a partner at Pricewaterhouse­Coopers. For a full copy of the report visit www.pwc.com/ie/bws

When PricewaterhouseCoopers launched its survey of Irish family businesses earlier this year it found the key threat to all family businesses was succession, and yet only 51% of Irish family bus­inesses have a formal succession plan in place. PwC's Paul Hennessy and Dermot Reilly explain why

Ownership succession

March 1, 2004

Most family firms have a formal succession plan in place, right? Wrong.

Most family firms have a formal succession plan in place, right? Wrong. Ireland and its business families, it seems, is the latest example to be held up in a growing list of apparently shoddy planners. Almost half of Irish family businesses have no formal succession plan in place, according to a survey by PricewaterhouseCoopers. The report, released in March, involved 55 family businesses ranging in size from those with fewer than 25 employees and an income of less than €2 million to those with more than 100 employees and an annual income of more than €20 million.

Click here >>
Close